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Tyrannosaurus rex by dustdevil Tyrannosaurus rex by dustdevil
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:iconcelestial-rainstorm:
Celestial-Rainstorm Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I think this is just gorgeous. 
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2014
Great !
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Aah, gotta love your style ;)
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:iconkellez:
Kellez Featured By Owner Edited Jul 1, 2014
I think their eyes were more lizard-like rather than bird-like? Just like structure of their brain.

Otherwise it's beautiful!
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:icontrisdino:
trisdino Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2014
That makes very little sense, seeing that they have a common ancestor with birds. 

I do not see how their brain would effect the look of their eyes, not to mention, their brains were not more lizard-like. Achrosaurs are in no way related to squamates, in fact, they are almost as distantly related to lizards as we are.
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:iconkellez:
Kellez Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2014
They are related to birds, aswell as lizards according to most archeologists.
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2014
You've got to be kidding me.
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:icontrisdino:
trisdino Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2014
1. Archaeologists, do not dig up dinosaurs, palaeontologists do.

2. No, they are not related to lizards at all. Lizards are squamates, in the order squamata, tyrannosaurus rex is a dinosaur, in the order archosauria. Birds ARE dinosaurs, and are far more closely related to T.rex than any lizard. 
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:iconkellez:
Kellez Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2014
"Birds ARE dinosaurs"
mmmkay..
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:icontrisdino:
trisdino Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2014
What is so weird about that?

Birds are in aves, in maniraptora, in theropoda, in dinosauria.
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:icontheomnivore:
TheOmnivore Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2014
By the way, are this pennaceous feathers or do the art style you choose just makes them look like they are?
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:iconromanyevseyev:
RomanYevseyev Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2014
Very good work=)!
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:iconmoonymina:
MoonyMina Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
gorgeous!!!!!!!
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:iconourpixieoverlords:
ourpixieoverlords Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2014
really fantastic! love it.
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:iconminyassa:
Minyassa Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Lovely! I have always thought they might have yellow eyes (I was thinking of big cats, I suppose), but the largest birds we have are all brown-eyed, aren't they.
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:iconneranella:
Neranella Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014
So excellent !! Impressive ! :w00t:
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:iconcarnosaur:
Carnosaur Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014  Professional General Artist
Nice to see you still creating my old friend. :)
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:iconrealtakara:
RealTakara Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow, in colour is better! ^^ This is young T-rex, yes? Because he have a more feathers.
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:iconpfunkei:
Pfunkei Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014
The hypothesis that T.rex juveniles had feathers and then lost them as they grew older isn't actually based on any fossil evidence as far as I know. That hypothesis is probably based off of large mammals like elephants, but even in those animals the loss of integument isn't as excessive as what is implied to have happened in T.rex and its ilk.

Another thing to note about this hypothesis is the discrepancy in bauplans between T.rex and elephants, despite the likely similar masses. Elephants are built more like a block than T.rex were, so they have a lower surface-area-to-volume ratio than the latter. This is significant because having a lower surface-area-to-volume ratio makes it harder to lose heat and vice versa. We can actually already see this principle illustrated in rhinos and giraffes. Rhinos and giraffes can also have around the same masses, at around 1 ton. However, giraffes are still fuzzier than rhinos, which are comparatively barren of any integument barring tough skin. Giraffes, of course, can even have a ridge of extra fur along their back. This is due to the giraffe bauplan having a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio than the rhino bauplan. Giraffes are therefore able to lose heat more easily than rhinos are able to, which allows giraffes to keep far more of their fur than rhinos can. This may very well be the case with T.rex and elephants respectively. 

This rings even more true when you take the discovery of Yutyrannus into account, along with the likelihood that the two species may have actually lived in similar climates. With all this in mind, it's quite possible that adult T.rex may have even looked like giant bears instead of the scaly behemoths that pop culture deifies. 
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:iconrealtakara:
RealTakara Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, I've learned about this from a movie"Dinosaur Revolution", which-by the way- is new, and I throught that's true. :D But thanks for explain, anyway. ;)
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:iconpfunkei:
Pfunkei Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2014
Also, you're welcome :)
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:iconpfunkei:
Pfunkei Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2014
Dinosaur documentaries tend to have far more entertainment value than educational value to be honest. Dinosaur Revolution does have some of the most accurate models that have ever been in a dinosaur documentary though. However, Dinosaur Revolution was originally intended to be a series of short fictional vignettes instead of the pseudo-documentary format it was shoehorned into by executives, so it wasn't actually meant to be taken at face value at first.

The most educational dinosaur documentary is probably Planet Dinosaur, since it at least takes the effort to show the evidence behind the CGI scenes being portrayed. However, even Planet Dinosaur has its fair share of problems, namely the portrayal of the venomous Sinornithosaurus hypothesis. That hypothesis turned out to be somewhat frail, as detailed here . However, for the most part, Planet Dinosaur is probably one of the best recent CGI dinosaur documentaries. It also came out relatively recently too, not much later after Dinosaur Revolution in fact. 
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:icontheomnivore:
TheOmnivore Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014
It could be said that each and every dinosaur documentary, no matter how correct at the time it was published, will detoriate in accuracy; sometimes less, sometimes more rapidly. As far as Tyrannosauroids go, the recent 2011-ish batch of dinosaur documentaries had the misfortune of being released before Y. huali was described. Let's see when new ones come out, and hope that they get their facts right.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014
Let's hope there are none that repeat WWD/B/M's mistakes.
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:iconaspidel:
aspidel Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Il est superbe, celui-là, très expressif.
N'empêche, je ne voudrais pas le rencontrer en forêt. :/
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:icondustdevil:
dustdevil Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014  Professional General Artist
Vaut mieux pas en effet...
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:iconorange-eyed-serpent:
orange-eyed-serpent Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Very beautiful, I love the feathers. I know some people think that tyrannosaurids *couldn't* have had pennaceous feathers, but I read that the Sinosauropteryx specimen was reexamined, and they've concluded that its feathers were likely at least stage 3, due to the fact that the thinner fillaments are almost always at an angle to the thicker ones.

dinogoss.blogspot.com/2012/08/… (That is where I've read it, since sadly I don't have access to the paper they mention.)
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:icontrisdino:
trisdino Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2014
it does seem unlikely that they had pennaceous feathers. They are quite distantly related to birds, far more so then say, microraptor, which did have them. It most likely had protofeathers, though that name in this context is quite silly, since they are not the predecessors of pennaceous feathers.
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